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I'm a bit confused about the meaning of this sentence:

But many of the world's resorts are struggling to cope with relentless waves of tourists, whose demands for ever more swimming pools and golf courses are sucking them dry. what is the meaning of for ever more ? what is the subject and the object here in the second part of the sentence ? what 'them' refers to ?

thank you.

1 Answer 1

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The first subject/verb pairing is [ many / are struggling ]. The verb phrase "are struggling" is intransitive. It has no object.

The second is [ demands / are sucking ]. This verb phrase here has two arguments: the direct object "them" (which refers back to the world's struggling resorts), and the object complement "dry" (which is the result of the sucking).

On its own, "for ever more" could mean something like eternally or never stopping. Here, "ever" modifies "more swimming pools and golf courses". This "ever more" means something like increasing over time or always becoming more.

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  • Thank you, so in the second part we can consider "whose demands for ever more swimming pools and golf courses" as the subject of the verb "are sucking". is it correct ?
    – slim Hass
    Commented Jun 11, 2020 at 21:46
  • More and more is another way of saying ever more. It's monotonically increasing over the time dimension. Commented Jun 12, 2020 at 1:32
  • That's right, @slimHass. The simple subject is "demands", and the complete subject is "whose demands for ever more swimming pools and golf courses". Commented Jun 12, 2020 at 14:10

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