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As far as I know, we can say "might have to" or "may have to", but I think I am not used to "can have to." Can we say, "can have to" like in this sentence I thought of: "You can have to buy me a new phone if you drop it." I know we can say, "You may/might have to buy me a new phone if you drop it (my phone)", but how about the phrase "can have to"? Is it generally ever usable?

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No, we don't say "can have to."

Generally the options are:

You may/might have to do x. (possibility)

You could have to do x. (possibility)

You will have to do x. (certainty)

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    Also possible is "You have to buy me a new phone if you drop it." This is also expressing certainty.
    – Peter
    Commented Jun 13, 2020 at 5:22
  • You could also say "You can buy me a new phone if you break it." (without the "have to"). Although "can" seems to express possibility, in that use it has an air of threat. Commented Jun 13, 2020 at 11:21
  • Thank you. How about "You can need to"? Is it used? It sounds like it might be wrong as well to me. Commented Jun 13, 2020 at 14:05
  • "You could have to" also sounds wrong to me unless it is used in indirect speech. Commented Jun 13, 2020 at 16:10

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