2

He seems to agree with most of us in that they're trying to conquer the world.

He seems to agree with most of us with that they're trying to conquer the world.

We say "agree with the idea", but in this context "in that" seems to be more appropriate, but I don't know exactly why I feel that way.

10
  • 1
    Do you mean "with that" or just "that"? There are two different ideas here. "He seems to agree with most of us, in that (he also believes for himself) they are trying to conquer the world". This is explaining his independent beliefs which match the thoughts of the others........................................................"He seems to agree with most of us that they are trying to conquer the world". This is explaining that he is part of the collective and thinks in unison. Jun 14, 2020 at 16:47
  • Neither is correct. Remove the unwanted preposition in from the first one. The significance of [statement 1] in that [statement 2] is that statement 1] is only true to a limited extent. Specifically, that it's only true when considered from the perspective of [statement 2]. But in your example, [statement 2] is the actual belief that he and most of us share (we're not talking about something else being true from the perspective of that belief). Jun 14, 2020 at 17:26
  • Most of us think that they're (whoever "they" are) trying to conquer the world. It would appear that he agrees with (most of) us. That's to say he thinks the same thing we do. Jun 14, 2020 at 17:30
  • @FumbleFingersReinstateMonica I disagree. The first sentence is common—at least as far as the usage I've heard and read. Although, typically, there would be a comma before the in. An alternative to in that is insofar as. Jun 14, 2020 at 17:50
  • @JasonBassford: I guess we must just agree to disagree in that this usage is common. I don't endorse in there, or in OP's cited example. Jun 14, 2020 at 17:58

1 Answer 1

0

He seems to agree with most of us in that they're trying to conquer the world.

This implies that he seems to agree with you, and "in that. . ." clarifies what exactly he agrees with you about.

He seems to agree with most of us with that they're trying to conquer the world.

This is incorrect because "with that" is not a phrase that means something here. It tries to pull the word "that" in two mutually exclusive directions.

He seems to agree with most of us with that.

This is fine. It would be better if it said "on that," but "with" is fine too.

"He seems to agree. . . that they're trying to conquer the world." This is fine.

"That" serves as a noun in the first, and a connector in the second. When you combine the two, these contradict each other. The one word cannot be both.

In a sentence, "that" must be used either as a pronoun or subordinating conjunction, not both.

The second sentence is awkward because subordinating conjunctions do not generally follow prepositions like "with" to introduce clauses.

Also, "with most of us" is already functioning as the object of the verb "agree." Adding another "with" with is confusing. What is it supposed to be doing? The reader can't tell.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .