4

I'll give you some examples

  1. The cocktail is easy to make with this bottle
  2. The cocktail is easy to be made with this bottle

what is the difference between the two in meaning? and grammatically, the number 1 can be rephrased as 'it is easy to make the cocktail with this bottle.' And then how can we rephrase the number 2?

And I found another sentence.

'it's best to be taken on an empty stomach'

can I also change this sentence to 'it's best to take on an empty stomach'? would the meaning be the same?

6

The meaning of the two sentences is essentially the same in this context. However, the second version is awkward because it's never (or almost never) used.

Nonetheless, the second sentence can be rephrased in the same way as the first—you just need to add a word. In fact, if you do that, it makes it natural.

  1. The cocktail is easy to make with this bottle.
    → It is easy to make the cocktail with this bottle.
  2. The cocktail is easy to be made with this bottle.
    → It is easy for the cocktail to be made with this bottle.

Note that the normal way of phrasing the original version of the second sentence is as follows:

  1. The cocktail is easily made with this bottle.
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  • This is what I wanted. Thank you so much. You are the best :) – SeongEun Bae Jun 14 at 7:54
2

For the cocktail bottle, 1 works, but 2 doesn't. Rather than 2 I would prefer "the cocktail is easily made with this bottle". For the medicine I would prefer the similar sentence "the medicine is best taken on an empty stomach."

I think that "it's best to be taken" sounds a little awkward, though I would not say it is actually incorrect. "It's best to take on an empty stomach" doesn't work, but you could use "it's best to take the medicine on an empty stomach" instead.

I think the form "this medicine is best taken on an empty stomach", "pasta is easily made with noodles", "arithmetic is easily done with a calculator" works most of the time.

Another problem is why sentence 1 works, but the apparently similar sentence "The medicine is best to take on an empty stomach" doesn't. I think that this is because the word "best" is relating back to the medicine instead of forward to the empty stomach. The statement reads as though it is comparing the medicine with other things that may be good to take on an empty stomach, but the advice really means that the medicine works best if taken on an empty stomach (instead of a full one).

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  • Thank you for the reply but I want to more focus on the grammar itself rather than how often the sentences are used. For me, it doesn't matter whether it's the cocktail bottle or not. Let's say, Pasta is easy to make with noodles. Then what is the difference between 1. Pasta is easy to make with noodles and 2. Pasta is easy to be made with noodles? If 2 doesn't work, what if I say, It's easy to be made with noodles? – SeongEun Bae Jun 14 at 6:42

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