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Could you tell me which preposition I use in the follwing sentence: in or from?

I've heard a noise in the kitchen. I had better go to check.

I've heard a noise from the kitchen. I had better go to check.

If both are possible, is there any difference?

2 Answers 2

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There is no difference in meaning: both indicate something in the kitchen is making a noise. You can be inside or outside the kitchen and say that you heard a noise in the kitchen, but you do need to be outside the kitchen to say you heard a noise from the kitchen.

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  • Taking the sentences in isolation from any context, you can also be in the kitchen and hear noise coming from outside. I heard the noise (happening outside) from the kitchen. I heard the noise (happening outside) in the kitchen. Commented Jun 16, 2020 at 21:27
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There can be a significant difference in the meaning between the two sentences, depending on context.

I've heard a noise in the kitchen. I had better go to check.

I'm standing somewhere other than the kitchen, and I've heard a noise that originates from the kitchen.

I've heard a noise from in the kitchen. I had better go to check.

I'm standing in the kitchen, and I've heard a noise that originates from somewhere else.


Whether they mean the same thing or not is entirely dependent on context. Either they mean the same thing, or they mean something completely different. The two sentences along don't give enough detail to say what's actually being described.

Where are you standing? Where is the noise coming from? Unless you can provide the missing details, it's not possible to say which preposition is better.

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