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The presence of the apparition disconcerted/pertrubed me.

Disconcerted/perturbed by all that is happening around them, they choose leave the town.

They feel disconcerted/perturbed by loss the of their friend.

Do these words mean the same thing? If either of the two words was used in these three sentences, would the sentences be grammatically correct? And do we use the word feel with either perturbed and disconcerted like in the last sentence?

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  • You've misspelled "perturbed". Aside from that, "feel" in the last sentence is correct use. You may wish to consult the dictionary definitions of the two words, and then ask about what is still unclear. Jun 17, 2020 at 1:55
  • I did look up both words before posting this question. They both seem to mean worried/unsettled and disconcerted has that added implication of confusion. I just wanted to if they could be used in similar contexts interchangeably. And I've never heard anyone say I "feel" disconcerted or perturbed. I've only heard people say "I was/am disconcerted/perturbed by that.", so i was curious as to whether people use feel with both words Jun 17, 2020 at 2:13

1 Answer 1

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Yes, those sentences would be grammatically correct with either word, and both perturbed and disconcerted can be used with "feel."

Perturbed and disconcerted are very close in meaning. I would say that perturbed implies more anxiety/discomfort and disconcerted implies more confusion.

In the context of a loss of a friend, I don't think either word is particularly appropriate--I would look for a word that has a stronger implication of grief.

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  • If I want to mean, with the last sentence, that they were unsettled by the loss of their friend, then I get to use either word, right? Since both words to some degree mean unsettled. Jun 17, 2020 at 2:36
  • I think unsettled is also a strange word to use for a reaction to someone's death: merriam-webster.com/dictionary/unsettled
    – Katy
    Jun 17, 2020 at 3:01
  • "Distressed" might fit better. Jun 17, 2020 at 5:36

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