0

A post that talks about the usage of "complement" uses this title

Is "complement" with fact, opinion or both?

in this pattern is A with B

Which was trying to ask whether the word "complement" should be used only with fact, opinion or both.

Is it clear and natural to say it that way?


Note: "complement" there is not used as a term. In other words, "complement" in that context is with the meaning of "Something that completes, makes up a whole, or brings to perfection", rather than a Grammar term.

  • @Lambie Thank you. Your answer is very informative. Btw, "complement" in the OP is with the meaning of "Something that completes, makes up a whole, or brings to perfection", rather than a Grammar term. – RobertH Jun 19 at 14:57
  • Please note: I deleted my comment and have now provided you with an answer. – Lambie Jun 19 at 16:25
  • ["complement" in the OP is with the meaning of= not grammatical. You mean: "complement" as asked by the OP means]. A term is another word for a word. – Lambie Jun 30 at 12:52
1

Action or active verb usage:

- This spice complements the soup.

- This answer complements the other answer.

- This dress color complements your complexion.

"Something that completes, makes up a whole, or brings to perfection", as per the OP's question.

"Is complement with fact or opinion", also in the OP's question.

That phrasing is not grammatical in English.
Correct phrasing of that question would be:

Is the word (term) complement used to express a fact or opinion?

complement is either an action/active verb or a noun.

Noun usage:

  • The complement to the book was the preface written by Professor Y.
  • The singing was a complement to the dinner party.
| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.