1

Are all of the sentences below correct?

  1. Do you know that girl with makeup?
  2. Do you know that girl with makeup on?
  3. Do you know that girl without makeup?
  4. Do you know that girl without makeup on?
  5. Do you know that girl who has makeup?
  6. Do you know that girl who has makeup on?

Context: Let's say I am asking about a female I see at a party. I know we can say 2, 4 and 6. How about 1, 3 and 5? I think 5 is probably wrong but I am more neutral about 1 and 3.

4
  • She can go to the party with make up or without make up. – Bruce Murray Jun 20 '20 at 0:43
  • @BruceMurray Do you think all six sentences are correct? – Fire and Ice Jun 20 '20 at 0:50
  • You mean to ask if they are idiomatic. I don't like any but that's not to say they can't be used. 1 and 5 seem wrong and would benefit from the definite article "with the make up" – Bruce Murray Jun 20 '20 at 8:19
  • You only use on, if there is doubt about what is being discussed: The actress did not have her make-up on at the beginning of the scene. If you say: with her make-up there, it could be referring to all the make-up items. – Lambie Jul 27 '20 at 16:36
4
+25

Do you know that girl with makeup? This is completely correct.

Do you know that girl with makeup on? For grammatical purposes, this is incorrect. In writing, it is generally incorrect to include a preposition at the end of a sentence, for example, "Where should we eat at?" I think this sentence is missing the object of the preposition, and would look better written out, such as Do you know that girl with makeup on her face? However it is implied that the makeup is on her face, so it is very idiomatic and generally accepted to exclude the "her face" in this situation, only if speaking. It still looks bad when written out.

Do you know that girl without makeup? Correct

Do you know that girl without makeup on? This sounds a bit awkward. While I think it could still be interpreted as native, I think it is more natural to say Do you know that girl without **any** makeup on?, and same general rules apply: bad to end with on however the her face is implied, so when speaking it is accepted.

Do you know that girl who has makeup? This is correct, but would sound more idiomatic as Do you know that girl wearing makeup?

Do you know that girl who has makeup on? This is... ok. Not great, just because the sentence is becoming cluttered. I can't say that it is any more incorrect than any other previous sentence, it just has a lot of words that don't need to be there. Also, bad to end with on however the her face is implied, so when speaking it is accepted.

EDIT

Do you know that girl who has no makeup This is correct. It is a little wordy, and would be better if it were shortened, maybe like Do you know that girl with no makeup?

Do you know that girl who doesn't have makeup This is starting to push the boundaries of things people don't normally say. It's technically correct, but it's very wordy and awkward to express all the syllables. I think most people would choose to phrase it differently than this.

5
  • "In writing, it is generally incorrect to include a preposition at the end of a sentence" - true, but on can also be interpreted as an adverb in this case. See the second meaning here and consider that people often talk about "wearing" makeup in a similar way to "wearing" eg. pants. – Maciej Stachowski Jul 27 '20 at 16:05
  • Thank you for your answer. You think "Do you know that girl who has no makeup" or "Do you know that girl who doesn't have makeup" would be correct too, right? I forgot to add these sentences to the OP. I'm sorry. – Fire and Ice Jul 27 '20 at 19:12
  • 1
    "Do you know that girl without makeup on," may be understood differently from, "Do you know that girl without makeup." The former identifies a girl with make up and asks if she is known to you. The latter sentence, on the other hand, may be asking if you recognize her without her makeup. Of course it's all contextual. – EllieK Jul 27 '20 at 19:17
  • 1
    @EllieK: Wouldn't the ambiguity occur equally in both cases? – epl Jul 27 '20 at 22:45
  • 1
    A few fine points: 1) Some of the options may seem "cluttered" for a sentence that begins a conversation, but for certain places in dialog, the extra words provide useful emphasis. 2) Option (4) sounds fine to me. (I'm US native.) – epl Jul 27 '20 at 22:57

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.