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"I bought apples." vs "I bought some apples."

Is the first sentence grammatical? If yes, is there any difference in meaning between the two?

Somehow I feel that if I am asked "What did you do yesterday?", "I bought some apples" sounds better than "I bought apples". Am I mistaken? On the other hand, if I am asked "What did you buy?", then "I bought apples" sounds fine to me.

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    Both are fine and are interchangeable in general usage. To address your second question, buying 'some apples' seems to imply a normal amount commensurate with a domestic shopping trip. However, the supply chain manager of a large warehouse might be inclined to say 'I buy apples'. – Bruce Murray Jun 25 '20 at 8:19
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    No, you can say 'today I bought apples' and that may have been the first time ever. Adding 'some' is just more colloquial and less formal, suited to verbal dialogue. You will see both and there is no definite right or wrong. – Bruce Murray Jun 25 '20 at 12:04
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    This question has been asked several times, I think. But there is no need to downvote people without a good reason. – Lambie Jun 25 '20 at 17:57
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    The same difference as saying "I bought a few apples" You should look "a few" up . If someone said "I bought [some/a few] apples" No one is going to interpret each one differently. Although I have to say Murray's comment above was thoughtful. – Mari-Lou A Jun 26 '20 at 5:15
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    Thanks! But somehow I feel that if I am asked "What did you do yesterday?", "I bought some apples" sounds better than "I bought apples". Am I mistaken? On the other hand, if I am asked "What did you buy?", then "I bought apples" sounds fine to me. – Kent Tong Jun 26 '20 at 7:04
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Both sentences are grammatically correct.

From a connotation standpoint, I would use the first if apples were on the family shopping list: "I bought apples" means that that particular item (apples) can be crossed off of the shopping list.

"I bought some apples" connotes a more impromptu motive: I was at the store for something else, apples caught my eye, so I bought some.

These are anecdotal examples of differences, but perhaps others can support or refute this interpretation.

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    +1 for usage in context. – Lambie Jun 25 '20 at 17:58
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    Some could also be used to stress that you didn't get the amount or variety that was expected. "Did you get the apples to make cider?" "I got some apples, but they only had 5kg. I'll go to the other shop tomorrow and get more". "Did you get the apples to make apple tart?" "I got some apples, but they didn't have any Granny Smith. See if the ones I bought are OK instead" – anotherdave Jun 26 '20 at 9:51

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