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Is it okay to say "to discover a person from another side" meaning "to find out something new about a person"?

Google returns zero results for "discover him from another side"

Will it be idiomatic in English to say that?

For example,

Had I had one more month, I might have discovered Peter from another side. But, sadly, as I had only as much time as I had, I am forced to state here that all I know about him is that he is a rather lukewarm player on a team showing little-to-zero enthusiasm in the project.

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  • 3
    It is more usual to say "I might have discovered another side of/to Peter." Commented Jun 25, 2020 at 17:40
  • I cannot decide whether it is genuinely old-fashioned or an ill-advised attempt at seeming old-fashioned. Commented Jun 26, 2020 at 3:08
  • @AntonSherwood - I can't understand what you mean. Can you, please, elaborate.
    – brilliant
    Commented Jun 26, 2020 at 3:59
  • The phrase is odd, in a way suggesting (at least to my intuition) that it might have been written more than a hundred years ago. The use of zero, on the other hand, is much more modern than the rest of the passage. Therefore I suspect an intentional archaism. Commented Jun 26, 2020 at 4:07
  • @AntonSherwood - What is intentional archaism? It's just that that phrase is very common in my first language, but I am not sure if it's also common in English. There is nothing intentional here.
    – brilliant
    Commented Jun 26, 2020 at 5:40

1 Answer 1

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There are some commonly used phrases for this:

  • gotten to know another side of [...]

  • seen another side of [...]

You could write,

Had I had one more month, I might have seen another side of Peter.

...or...

Had I had one more month, I might have gotten to know Peter a little better.

As a side note, I reccomend that you not share your opinions about Peter with anyone else. Your thoughts are downright cruel.

Peter is a rather lukewarm player on a team which shows little-to-no enthusiasm in the project.

That is not nice at all.

Also, try to avoid having more than 2 or 3 clauses inside of the same sentence.

  1. But

  2. sadly.

  3. as I had only as much time as I had.

  4. I am forced to state here that

  5. All I know is that

That is too many optional clauses. Optional clauses such as "I am forced to state here" fail to add any additional information.

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  • "I reccomend that you not share your opinions about Peter with anyone else. Your thoughts are downright cruel" - In fact, this recommendation of yours is rather cruel. You know nothing about who I shared my opinions about Peter with. They were all fine and even thankful to me afterwards. Saying "don't share that with anyone else" is rather presumptuous on your part..
    – brilliant
    Commented Oct 19, 2022 at 5:55
  • How is "but" a clause???
    – brilliant
    Commented Oct 19, 2022 at 5:57
  • "Optional clauses such as "I am forced to state here" fail to add any additional information" - It informs the reader of the fact that what I am about to state regarding Peter is something that I wouldn't want to state otherwise had it not been for this particular circumstance (lack of time spent with Peter).
    – brilliant
    Commented Oct 19, 2022 at 6:03

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