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Is it possible to use already without have/had in front?

For example:

I already eat/ate

?

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    Short answer is yes. Longer answer is that "already" + simple past is common in the US when talking about a past event that has an effect in the present (I ate before, so I'm not hungry now), but present perfect is strongly preferred elsewhere in the world, so much so that it could be marked wrong on a test.
    – gotube
    Jul 2 at 6:37
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Yes, it's fine to use "already" without using "have" or "had."

With past tense, it refers to a specific instance:

Person A: Want to get pizza for dinner?

Person B: No thanks, I already ate.

With present tense, it refers to a general habit:

Person A: You need to improve your diet.

Person B: No, I don't! I already eat lots of fruit and vegetables.

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    Isn't the question about past tense vs present/past perfect, not past tense vs present?
    – Son Nguyen
    Jun 26 '20 at 10:42
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    @SonNguyen The question is "Is it possible to use "I already eat/ate" and the answer is yes.
    – Katy
    Jun 27 '20 at 3:00
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Yes, it is possible because the already is an action that you made in the past or in that moment. You never ever use "already" in a question! Already is placed at the beginning of the sentence, after the person and the auxiliary verb (if there is one) and before the verb. Do not get dizzy, because it is actually easier than it seems. Look: I’ve already done it. It’s already here. They’ve already done their homework.

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  • Your answer is not correct. You never ever use "already" in a question? Please find references for the information you are giving.
    – fev
    Jul 3 at 10:22
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Yes! It is possible to use "already" without using "have" or "had" in front.

We can use "already" + simple past If we talk about something that happened in the past but has an effect in the present.

For example:

Emilio: Hey! Anna. Do you want to get sushi? Anna: Hey! No thanks. I already ate.

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  • Can you give reference for the information you are giving? You say, "If we talk about something that happened in the past but has an effect in the present." This will be confusing for English learners, as this is normally the description of the present perfect tense.
    – fev
    Jul 2 at 19:08

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