1

What is the difference in the following three sentences regarding usage of the determiner?

The right to work implies the obligation on the part of the government to give a job to all the unemployed.

The right to work implies the obligation on the part of the government to give a job to each of the unemployed.

The right to work implies the obligation on the part of the government to give a job to all of the unemployed.

2

each of is less ambiguous as it implies each person gets one job each. all or all of (I can't think of a real difference beside all of sounding more natural) could mean one common job given to everyone. Of course in this example it is obvious common sense to assume each, but in some cases it does have double meaning:

The company is giving a $1000 bonus to all of its employees

could either imply a collective sum for a team, or one for each individual as this less ambiguous sentence implies:

The company is giving a $1000 bonus to each of its employees

2
  • I don't think "...each of the unemployed," would be used in this context. It would be more commonly phrased, "...every unemployed person." If I had a good explanation for when to use 'each' and when to use 'every' I would be quick to share it. But I do not. – EllieK Jun 26 '20 at 17:09
  • 1
    Yes, each of the unemployed doesn't sound right. If the question was not finding the difference, but selecting one correct choice, then everyone would definitely go for all of the unemployed even though it's technically ambiguous – Son Nguyen Jun 27 '20 at 5:58

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