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Consider the following conversation.

Daniel: What a fantastic film! Wasn’t it great?

Kae: Are you insane? It was the worst movie I’ve seen all year.

Daniel: Why would you say that? It was amazing!

Kae: Forget it. It’s two hours of my life I’m never getting back.

Daniel: Why don’t we get something to eat? Your pick.

I guess Daniel omits "It's" there and the following two expressions mean the same thing as the one above.

Daniel: Why don’t we get something to eat? It's your pick.

Daniel: Why don’t we get something to eat? It's your call.

From the Cambridge Dictionary

pick: a choice, or something that is chosen

Is my understanding correct?

If you were Daniel, what would you say in real life?

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Kae is displeased about the film that Daniel liked so well. Daniel is trying to salvage their date by placating her, changing the subject to dinner, and letting her have complete freedom of choice in where and what they eat: "your pick". He might be afraid that if he chooses something, she will still be dissatisfied.

I don't know if all that is true, but it seems as good a theory as any other, without more context.

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  • Thank you. If you were Daniel, what would you say in real life?
    – JQQ
    Jun 27, 2020 at 6:49
  • "If you don't like the same movies I do, I'm not wasting money on buying you dinner. I'll call a cab to take you home." What would you say, JQQ? Jun 27, 2020 at 15:00
  • Seriously, I might say, "Lets go to dinner. Where would you like to go." Jun 27, 2020 at 15:00

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