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From a tutorial (Transcript)

the focus of this lesson will be learning to navigate HTML to arrive at the content we may be interested in retrieving.

in doing so, we will use a simple toy model of HTML as we become comfortable with how the code looks behind the scenes, and ...

In the second part of the quotation, let A = "use a simple toy model of HTML", and B = "comfortable with how the code looks behind the scenes".

I understand the meanings of A and B separately but I don't understand the whole meaning of "we will A as we become B".

It seems that B is some kind of condition for A, if "as" means "when" or "at the same time" in this particular context. Grammatically, this interpretation sounds correct. However, the learning process is not like that. By going through it, people would find that the tutorial uses that toy model to explains how HTML code looks, rather than the other way around.

On the other hand, if the interpretation of "as" could be that, A is a way to achieve B, the whole sentence makes more sense.

Is my understanding correct?

Is it common to use "as" to convey the relationship that way?

How about this one?

in doing so, we will become comfortable with how the code looks behind the scenes, and ... as we use a simple toy model of HTML

Which seems grammatically correct and fits the learning process, though the part before "as" might be too long to easily understand.

  • The second interpretation is incorrect: the intent looks the opposite, that is B somehow leading to A, not the other way around. So as could mean something like now that we become... (if it referred to the present not future) or simply when as suggested. – Son Nguyen Jun 29 '20 at 4:40
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I don't follow your explanation so I will start over.

First, you will learn how the toy HTML looks behind the scenes. Then, eventually, as you become comfortable with how this looks, you will progress to more difficult stuff.

It does not seem like a condition, exactly, and yet it is. So long as the toy HTML looks like a confusing jumble of characters, you're not ready for more difficult stuff. But when you feel comfortable with the code, as you kind of grow into it, you will move on to a new, slightly more difficult phase, of training.

That is my understanding with regards to the grammar, but I don't understand computer/internet code and HTML. You don't show enough of the tutorial for me to be able to see the entire pattern of instruction. Thus, I can't be completely sure I understand the process. However, I feel confident regarding the grammar. It is trying to show that you will grow into more difficult information, that more difficult information will be presented when you are ready. First the easy stuff, then when you are ready they present the more difficult. It's not as harsh as a condition.

UPDATE

I found the quote in the YouTube and transcribed the entire sentence below for a clearer understanding of the speaker's intention:

The focus of this lesson will be learning to navigate HTML to arrive at the content we may be interested in retrieving. In doing so, we will use a simple toy model of HTML as we become comfortable with how the code looks behind the scenes, and see that we can picture a tree-like structure of HTML to easily interpret the task of HTML navigation.

To understand that sentence, we have to understand the instruction style of the tutorial. The instruction style is to present a very simple piece of HTML coding, also known as toy HTML. He does this to make the student feel comfortable or familiar with coding. The word "as" does not really mean much the way he uses it.

On the other hand, if the interpretation of "as" could be that, A is a way to achieve B, the whole sentence makes more sense.

No, A is not a way to achieve B in this case. Perhaps it might be said that B is a way of achieving A.

Let's look at the sentence again:

in doing so, we will use a simple toy model of HTML as we become comfortable with how the code looks behind the scenes, and ...

Let's get rid of the sentence fragments before and after the parts under discussion so that our sentence looks thus:

We will use a simple toy model of HTML as we become comfortable with how the code looks behind the scenes.

That could be rearranged to say:

As we become comfortable with how the code looks behind the scenes, we will use a simple toy model of HTML.

Becoming comfortable, feeling familiar, with the coding behind the scenes is the foundation to learning more. He will not introduce more difficult material until you feel comfortable. As you become comfortable, he will introduce more. Thus "as" is interpreted to indicate the conditions of process, if that makes sense.

How about this one?

in doing so, we will become comfortable with how the code looks behind the scenes, and ... as we use a simple toy model of HTML

I think you got it! If I correctly understand your meaning, you mean the same as I do.

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    Thank you. By going through it, people would find that the tutorial uses that toy model to explains how HTML code looks, rather than the way around. – JQQ Jun 29 '20 at 6:24
  • I edited my answer to reflect this information. Maybe it makes more sense now. – Sarah Bowman Jun 29 '20 at 6:44
  • Thank you. Does "don't follow" mean my explanation is not easily understandable? If yes, I guess it's a good chance to improve my English in practice. Would you please point out from which my explanation goes understandable? I guess "let A ..." part is understandable, isn't? How about the part after it? – JQQ Jun 30 '20 at 5:09
  • Your English is fine. Most people probably could follow; it's just the way my brain works. I get confused sometimes by technical details. Yes, I understood the part about "Let A=..." I wanted to work with that, and with my understanding of English language, rather than get confused by the rest. My answer may not be good. I'll think about it some more. Possibly I can fix it; I'm not sure at this point. – Sarah Bowman Jun 30 '20 at 13:02
  • I was able to "follow" your explanation now. I updated my answer. I never realized how complicated my language was! Does this answer your question? – Sarah Bowman Jun 30 '20 at 13:48

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