0

A teacher that has not yet retired but is going to soon says

I have been teaching for 15 years now, this year my pupils are 12 years old but I have not always been teaching to pupils from this age

I was wondering if present perfect continuous is a good choice or shall I use present perfect simple (i don't think so because the situation is still true and there is a chance that the situation will be true until he retires )or past simple (but as he is still teaching i don't think it will match

  • 1
    I would use "I have been teaching for 15 years now. This year my pupils are 12 years old, but I have not always taught 12-year-olds." In your version, it is important to remove the word "from", and you should also remove the "to", but it isn't as big a deal. Using "from this age" is usually used when stating a range of ages - "from this age up" or "from age 12 to age 20" – Justin Stafford Jun 30 at 6:20
  • Why not have been teaching because I have always been teaching – user5577 Jun 30 at 12:30
  • why not have not always been teaching is it because it is completed so simple is better i don't understand the logic to use simple or continuous in that case – Yves Lefol Jul 1 at 7:46

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.