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cor‧ner 1 /ˈkɔːnə $ ˈkɔːrnər/ ●●● S1 W2 noun

1 WHERE TWO LINES/EDGES MEET [countable] the point at which two lines or edges meet

He pulled a dirty handkerchief out by its corner and waved it at me.

corner of Their initials were sewn on the corner of every pillow.

in the corner (of something) The TV station’s name appears in the corner of the screen.

on the corner (of something) Jessie sat on the corner of her bed.

three-cornered/four-cornered etc a three-cornered hat

Normally, dictionaries often say "the corner of a thing", for example, "the corner of the room". However, there are corners that are formed by 2 or 3 things. Then, how are we going to express it, for example, "the corner of the wall and the wardrobe" or "the corner between the wall and the wardrobe"?

Do we say "lean the broom in the corner of the wall and the wardrobe" or "lean the broom in the corner between the wall and the wardrobe"?

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Saying “in the corner of the wall and the wardrobe” sounds wrong to me; generally speaking I think a corner should be said to belong only to one thing.

While much better, in my opinion, I also think that “in the corner between the wall and the wardrobe” could be confusing, as I might find myself looking for a corner of the room between a wall and a wardrobe. However, if this description were accompanied by someone pointing and phrasing it as “this/that corner” instead of “the corner” I think any confusion would be removed.

I think something like the following would be appropriate:

Lean it between the wall and the wardrobe.

Rest it between the wall and the wardrobe.

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  • "In this/that corner" is a good choice. But, what about "the corner where the wardrobe meets the wall"
    – Tom
    Jul 2, 2020 at 0:09
  • That would also be fine, although very mildly theatrical/amusing to my ears. Again, though, I don’t think you’d need to describe it as a corner, “where the wardrobe meets the wall” would be sufficient.
    – Chris Mack
    Jul 2, 2020 at 9:26

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