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The officer walks down the hallway. He notices that one of the doors is ajar. He pushes it open silently. And enters.

Questions to this:

Is the part in bold okay? Would you phrase it differently?

I'm asking because pushes sounds forceful to me but maybe adding silently makes it okay?

  • The only possible issue I see is and enters as a sentence on its own. As a short sentence, I think it would sound better as he enters, which matches the previous sentences. Otherwise, add it to the sentence before. As for the original question, it could also be he silently pushes it open, which is an order I think is slightly more natural. (But the use of silently itself, in whichever position, is fine.) – Jason Bassford Jul 1 at 14:17
  • You might also consider noiselessly instead of silently to emphasise the door made no noise as opposed to the officer making no sound. But is it fine as it is and I would not be unhappy with And enters as a sentence. Short sentences crank up the suspense. – mdewey Jul 1 at 14:36
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While it is correct, you can improve the flow by re-arranging the words and removing "pushes" all together. Try:

The officer walks down the hallway. He notices that one of the doors is ajar. Silently, he opens it and enters.

Since you already said that the door is ajar, there's also no reason to mention that he opens it at all.

The officer walks down the hallway. He notices that one of the doors is ajar and silently enters it.

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I'm asking because pushes sounds forceful to me

Not always! You can gently push the door to open it, especially the one which is already slightly open.

The officer walks down the hallway, notices that one of the doors is ajar, gently pushes it (open), and enters.

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