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  1. My father takes some medicine so he feels quite drowsy.
  2. My father is taking some medicine so he's feeling quite drowsy.

What would someone think if I said the second one instead of the first one?

  • What does the title have to do with the rest of your question? – Eddie Kal Jul 5 at 21:58
  • The first sentence is odd. It sounds like he is taking medicine for the purpose of becoming drowsy. The second means that he habitually takes medicine (such as daily), and drowsiness is a side effect of the medicine. – Jason Bassford Jul 6 at 1:05
  • First I tried to title it 'What's the difference between these two sentences?' but I couldn't. And I didn't come up with something better than this title. I'll rename it. – Beowulf Jul 6 at 1:09
  • @Jason Bassford, thank you very much! – Beowulf Jul 6 at 1:25
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My father takes some medicine so he feels quite drowsy.

This sentence sounds weird to me, and rightly so.

Using the present simple tense with a verb often means something that's always or generally true. "I play the piano" means something like "I know how to play the piano" or "I enjoy playing the piano" which are actions/states that generally won't change.

My father is taking some medicine so he's feeling quite drowsy.

This should be correct. This means "My father is now taking some medicine.", where "now" can be any stretch of time including the present. The father could have just started taking the medicine yesterday or today, or will stop taking it tomorrow. It's currently true, but the action won't last forever.

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