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Is there another way to say "something has no more to do with something, than something"?

Marx emphasized that ‘since exchange-value is a definite social manner of expressing the amount of labor bestowed upon an object, Nature has no more to do with it, than it has in fixing the course of exchange ... so far no chemist has ever discovered exchange-value either in a pearl or a diamond.

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    Where is that text from, please? It doesn't seem to be googleable. It seems to be saying simply that valuation is a social phenomenon, not a physical property, which is true but trivial. Jul 10, 2020 at 21:56
  • Please add at least attribution to the quotation, if not a link to the source. Jul 11, 2020 at 2:25

2 Answers 2

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The specific question

The following was the specific question:

Is there another way to say "something has no more to do with something, than something"?


Let's start with a different example:

Yellow paint has no more to do with the study of geriatrics than it has to do with turning on a TV.

The sentence can also be expressed symbolically:

A has no more to do with X than it has to do with Y.


The normally assumed meaning

Most often, this is interpreted in the sense that A has little to do with X or Y:

Yellow paint has equally little to do with the study of geriatrics and turning on a TV.

However, the fact it doesn't have much to do with either of those things is really understood from context.


The literal meaning

The literal meaning of the sentence is simply that A doesn't have more to do with X than it has to do with Y.

In other words, the following could also be true:

Health has no more to do with the study of geriatrics than it has to do with the study of pediatrics.

Health actually has a lot to do with both of those things, but what the sentence is actually saying is this:

Health's involvement in the study of geriatrics is not greater than its involvement in the study of pediatrics.

This can also be expressed symbolically:

A's involvement in X ≤ its involvement in Y.


The example sentence in the question

The same analysis can be applied to the example sentence in the question, assuming I'm parsing it correctly:

Nature has no more to do with the amount of labour bestowed upon an object than it has to do with fixing the course of exchange.

As per the above, this can be rephrased in two different ways.

  • The common interpretation:

    Nature has equally little to do with the amount of labour bestowed upon an object and fixing the course of exchange.

  • The literal interpretation:

    Nature's involvement in the amount of labour bestowed upon an object is not greater than it's involvement in fixing the course of exchange.

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"X has no more to do with Y than with Z" means that X has no effect on either Y or Z. Normally, Z is something that everyone would agree that X has no effect on, and Y is a more arguable case.

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