1

I wonder how English-speaking people can describe time periods in this particular case. The amount of work to be done is big and will surely take three days but how many days after it is not known. Supposing, there are two situations: when asked privately (1) and when as an employee (2). Can you say:

1 a. I'll be doing this (for) more than three days.

1 b. I'll get it done after three days.

1 c. The job will be finished in about three days.

2 a. We can do this for you in three days.

2 b. We're working on it from three days.

2 c. The task will be complete in more than three days.

It is also interesting if the expression is natural or at least understood: “It takes three-plus days”. Do you use it and how is it good stylistically then?

1
  • 1
    The job will take at least three days. – Weather Vane Jul 11 '20 at 15:19
1

1 a. I'll be doing this (for) more than three days.

This means you'll work on the job for three days, but it doesn't strictly mean you'll have completed the job at the end of the three days.

1 b. I'll get it done after three days.

I'd interpret this to mean that you'll finish the job at the end of the third day.

1 c. The job will be finished in about three days.

This means the job could take slightly more or slightly less than three days.

2 a. We can do this for you in three days.

This means you're confident the job won't take more than three days.

2 b. We're working on it from three days.

This means you won't start until three days from now.

2 c. The task will be complete in more than three days.

This just isn't idiomatic in my experience. You could say "the task will take more than three days" instead.

As mentioned in comments, the most common way to express what you asked about is "the job will take at least three days".

0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.