0

It's from the second episode of the first season of Breaking Bad.

And just so you know, my brother-in-law is a DEA agent...

...and I will not hesitate to call him. Not if I have to. Understood?

This is your one and only warning.

Does that mean that the person won't call the agent, but will call if she has to. I am confused.

5
  • 2
    Having said "I will not hesitate to call him" the bolded sentence can be expanded to "I will not hesitate to call him if I have to." Commented Jul 17, 2020 at 11:44
  • 1
    I will not hesitate to call him, if I have to [call him]. Commented Jul 17, 2020 at 11:46
  • Thanks, but that is not actually what I cannot get. I cannot get what "not" is there for. I can't get the phrase as a whole. Commented Jul 17, 2020 at 11:56
  • I read the "not" as a restatement of the "not hesitate" part of the first statement.
    – mike65535
    Commented Jul 17, 2020 at 12:12
  • I will not hesitate to call him, not [hesitate, that is,] if I have to [call him]. Commented Jul 17, 2020 at 12:18

1 Answer 1

0

...and I will not hesitate to call him. Not if I have to. Understood?

"Not if I have to" is a callback to the previous statement about calling his brother-in-law. It should be understood as "I will not hesitate if I have to call him".

It is a threat that he will only make the call if he feels compelled to by the other person's actions.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .