2

What would be the most idiomatic phrase here to describe the fact that the whole family was having lunch?

  1. Last Friday we were having lunch at a new eatery by the whole family.

  2. Last Friday we were having lunch at a new eatery as a whole family.

  3. Last Friday we were having lunch at a new eatery with the whole family.

  4. ?

  • 4. Last night the whole family was having dinner at a new eatery. – Weather Vane Jul 18 at 10:56
  • @WeatherVane - Thank you. I just changed "night" to "Friday". – brilliant Jul 18 at 11:04
  • Who is "we" meant to refer to? Asking cause I would interpret example 2 as referring to the family, but example 3 as referring to part of the family, e.g. son and his wife. – wjandrea Jul 18 at 15:52
2

None of those sentences is very idiomatic.

The problem isn't the preposition that should be used in the last part of the sentence, but the fact that the last part of the sentence should actually be towards the start of the sentence instead.

In other words, the following is much more common and natural:

  1. Last Friday, the whole family was having lunch at a new eatery.

If you want to emphasize that you were part of the family, then use the possessive pronoun rather than the definite article:

  1. Last Friday, our whole family was having lunch at a new eatery.
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