0

I read somewhere that when we use subordinate conjuction in the middle of a sentence we don't , necessarily, use a comma. However I read some sentences today where a comma is used before though (in middle) in a complex sentence. Please guide.

He doesn’t like flying, though he enjoyed his trip to Italy last year.

Although he enjoyed his trip to Italy, he does not like flying.

According to my knowledge the first one has incorrect punctuation because though is in the middle of the sentence, but it is correct. I want to know how is it possible? Isn't there any hard and fast rule for using commas with subordinate conjunctions?

In conclusion, family encompasses a lot more people than just parents and children and moving abroad is not helpful in the terms of family development though it may be good for education and job prospects.

My teacher pointed a comma mistake before though in this sentence.

0

@Sudhir Sharma

(1) 'He doesn’t like flying, though he enjoyed his trip to Italy last year.'

and

(2) 'In conclusion, family encompasses a lot more people than just parents and children and moving abroad is not helpful in the terms of family development though it may be good for education and job prospects.'

In both examples, the dependent clause comes after its independent clause; hence, comma is not allowed.

(1) the comma before 'though' needs to be removed; (2) this is fine.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .