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Is it valued or set? I have read again and again, but I am not sure either of them is better than the other. Does the comma(,) preceding or function as a guide?

This is particularly true for people who have been valued for performance standards set by parents or the educational system, or measured by other cultural norms that are internalized and no longer questioned.

  • or measured by other internalized and unquestioned cultural norms – Lambie Jul 23 at 18:33
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"Valued" is parallel to "measured."

This is particularly true for people who have been:

  • valued for (performance standards [that have been] set by parents or the educational system),

  • measured by other cultural norms that are internalized and no longer questioned.

The sentence structure simplifies down to: "This is true for people who have been valued this way or have been measured that way."

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TLDR: 'measured' is parallel to 'valued'

This sentence can be simplified to:

This is particularly true for people who have been valued [...], or measured [...].

Normally, the , or doesn't need a comma. In fact, we can take it completely out of the simplified sentence I just wrote:

This is particularly true for people who have been valued [...] or measured [...].

However, the author was being kind and provided us the comma (,) because there is another instance of or in the sentence, and did not want to confuse the reader, otherwise the sentence could have mistakenly be read as:

This is particularly true for people [...] or the educational system or measured [...].

and this would confuse the reader, who would have to read the sentence again to understand what the author meant to say.

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