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It's from the 12th episode of the 2nd season of Breaking Bad. Here is the context:

Jesse's girlfiend: He's a high-school teacher. What's he gonna do, give you a B-minus?

Send you outside to clap the erasers?

Jesse: You wouldn't really go to the cops, would you?

Jesse's girlfriend: We won't have to. He'll pay.

Jesse: And what if he doesn't?

Jesse's girfriend: Jesse, it's your money.

You're in the right here. He's in the wrong. He's not stupid. He'll pay.

What is it, really? You don't want your half a million dollars?

You wanna renounce your earthly possessions and become a monk?

Jesse: No, it's just, I'm not the kind of dude who rolls.

  • Similar to "rolls off" or "rolls out", "rolls away"... leaves; exits; moves - and in this case, abandons (his friends) – Justin Stafford Jul 25 at 10:59
  • It might mean "roll over", in the sense of surrender, or in the sense of giving information to the police. – Jack O'Flaherty Jul 25 at 11:11
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As Jack has mentioned in his comments, “rolls”, in this context, means to inform on one’s colleagues. It means to become a confidential informant or a “rat”. It is short for “roll over”. It usually involves giving information on one’s partners in crimes in which the informant themselves are also culpable, involved, or a party to. There is usually an understanding of reciprocity of some sort on the part of law enforcement for such self-incremenation. Amnesty, reduced sentences or just ignoring the fact of the informant’s involvement are the norm. An innocent bystander or an uninvolved party could not roll over, in this case. They would just be considered a witness.

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There are an incredible number of very different definitions for "roll" in the dictionary, but the one that applies here is to rob someone or rip them off.

https://www.collinsdictionary.com/us/submission/9968/Got+rolled

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