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"These rides include The Incinerator, where visitors are lifted up to a height of around 100 meters; Le Dragon, where visitors are sent on an awe-inspiring adventure; The Greenery, a rollercoaster described by Robert Surname of The Sentinel as "[a] true spectacular marvel"; and The Penguin of Doom (TPoD), which sends visitors down a calming-at-first water ride, after which they are splashed."

If the rides mentioned are only a portion of the total rides in the park, then should the beginning phrase be "These rides include" or "Some of these rides include"? Also should there be a colon after include?

2 Answers 2

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A colon would work, but it isn't required.  That's a question of style and clarity.

Because the rides themselves are listed by name, "some of these rides include...." wouldn't make much sense.  The verb "include" implies a portion, and "some ... include" implies a portion of a portion.

Some of these rides include a souvenir picture.

Here, it make sense.  The souvenir picture is a portion of the ride experience.  A portion of the available rides provides that portion of the experience.

 

Since certain rides themselves are the object of "include", there's nothing left for the "some" to turn into a portion.

Some of these rides are The Incinerator, Le Dragon, The Greenery, and TPoD.

Here, the given list is a portion of the total rides in the park.  The "some" is enough to show that this list is a portion of the total list.  There's no reason to use "includes" to imply some other kind of portion.

These rides include The Incinerator, Le Dragon, The Greenery, and TPoD.

Again, the list is a portion of the park's total rides.  The "includes" is enough to show that.  There's no reason to use "some" to imply some other kind of portion.

Some of these rides include The Incinerator, Le Dragon, The Greenery, and TPoD.

Here, we have one portion and two different things calling for a portion.  It's as if the "some" and the "include" are in competition over the same list.  It leaves me wondering what other kind of portion I'm supposed to be able to find in the sentence.

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We are discussing a set of rides, and we are making a list of some of them.
There are several ways we can do this.

There are many rides. Some of the rides are [list]

Some of the rides included are [list]

In those two cases, the word "are" means that we are equating "some" to the list of rides that follows.

These rides include [list]
In this case, it is "all of the rides" that "include" the list.
You can't apply the word "some" to "all of the rides".

So, the answer to your question is no, the quoted text is correct as it is.

Yes, a colon could be used there, and might make the long series that follows easier to understand.

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