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I came across a sentence, which struck me a bit unusual. My question is regarding the order of the words. Why does "for me" go after "would be" in this case? Is it correct? "The best thing for me" sounds more natural for me.

Here's the sentence: The best thing would be for me to take Amy and go where no one will ever find us.

  • The best thing would be (for me (to take Amy and go where no one will ever find us)). – Hot Licks Aug 2 at 17:44
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    The two different orders have two different meanings. – Peter Shor Aug 2 at 18:00
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    Shouldn't your username be either “Meum Mysterium” in the neuter singular or else “Mea Mysteria” in the neuter plural? That way the numbers and genders would both match. Are you trying to use a feminine mea because you think it would work like English and reflect the sex of the possessor rather than the gender of the thing possessed? Merely compare John Sebastian Bach’s Magnificat anima mea with Tomás Luis de Victoria’s O magnum mysterium to meditate upon these mysteries. :) – tchrist Aug 2 at 18:21
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    For me precedes, and is the subject of, the conjoined infinitive clause to take Amy and go where no one will ever find us. That infinitive clause is the complement of The best thing would be, which comprises the beginning of the main clause. So the reason why for me is where it is is that it isn't saying who springing into action is the best thing for -- rather, it's saying who should be springing into action. In other words, it's not part of the main clause; it's part of the subordinate clause and that's why it appears there. – John Lawler Aug 2 at 19:01
  • @Peter Shor, yeah! Somehow I didn't think of it this way. Thank you! – Mea Mysterium Aug 2 at 19:24
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In a comment John Lawler wrote:

For me precedes, and is the subject of, the conjoined infinitive clause to take Amy and go where no one will ever find us. That infinitive clause is the complement of The best thing would be, which comprises the beginning of the main clause. So the reason why for me is where it is is that it isn't saying who springing into action is the best thing for -- rather, it's saying who should be springing into action. In other words, it's not part of the main clause; it's part of the subordinate clause and that's why it appears there.

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  • I can only vote for the answer as 'useful', but it is also correct :) – Will Crawford Aug 3 at 0:59

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