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I hope that you have a good time with her and everything is going according to your plans.

I am asking this question because I have an English test. I wonder whether I should put comma in both sentences, and I didn't put a comma before "and" in the first sentence because I thought if I did I would have to write it like this.

I hope that you have a good time with her, and I hope everything is going according to your plans.

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Rather than "independent clause" I'd describe these as two coordinated clauses:

you have a good time with her

everything is going according to your plans

They are equal to each other and joined with the coordinating conjuction "and".

A comma is correct, but I'd consider it optional, as both expressions are subordinate to the "I hope" clause.

One possiblity is to say:

I hope that you have a good time with her, and that everything is going according to your plans.

Which more explicitly links the final clause back to "hope".

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[1] I hope that [you have a good time with her] and [everything is going according to your plans.

[2] [I hope that you have a good time with her], and [I hope everything is going according to your plans.

In [1] the bracketed elements are a coordination of clauses functioning within the large content clause beginning with "that". No comma is required.

In [2] the bracketed elements are a coordination of independent clauses where the comma is optional but preferred.

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