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The coronavirus pandemic has wreaked havoc on the global jobs market, leaving many unemployed, furloughed or working reduced hours as employers implemented sweeping cost-cutting measures.

If the "as" is a conjunction in this sentence, does it mean "so"?

Can I rewrite the sentence like The coronavirus pandemic has wreaked havoc on the global jobs market, so employers implemented sweeping cost-cutting measures like leaving many unemployed, furloughed, or working reduced hours.

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  • No, certainly not! It's a preposition that happens to have a clause as complement. It's true that dictionaries say it's a conjunction, but the rule is 'never use dictionaries for grammar'!
    – BillJ
    Aug 5 '20 at 11:23
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It's a conjunction, but it doesn't mean "so", it means "while".

Cambridge "as" conjunction
"during the time that:
I saw him as I was coming into the building.
He gets more attractive as he gets older."

Many people are being laid off as employers cut costs.

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  • Does “as” mean "because"
    – fanacc
    Aug 5 '20 at 2:36
  • It can, as you will see in the Cambridge definition. Look at the examples they offer for that use; it is different, and I think "while" is the intended sense in this example. Aug 5 '20 at 2:55

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