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When our children learn to pee themselves, we need to tell them to hold the edge of their tops up high to their chins so that they don't pee on their tops.

These are the list of says that I think of:

  • Hold the edge of your top up high to your chin while peeing.

  • Hold your top up high to your chin while peeing.

  • Hold the edge of your top up high with your chin while peeing.

  • Tuck your top under your chin while peeing.

Which of the above sayings are idiomatic?

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Hold your shirt up, and tuck it under your chin.

When someone pees themselves it means they've had an accident and peed in their clothes, diaper, etc. When they learn to pee by themselves, they learn to do it without help. This is one aspect of potty training or toilet training.

If you deliberately said "top" to refer to something other than a shirt, it would be more idiomatic to say whatever it is (jumper, dress, blouse, etc.). Otherwise just say "shirt."

| improve this answer | |
  • When my boy (who is now over 40) was at this stage, I just used to say "don't pee on your vest/shirt" and leave it up to his ingenuity to work out a method of achieving that goal. – Michael Harvey Aug 10 at 9:14
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  1. Hold your top up by/to your chin while peeing.

  2. Tuck your top under your chin while peeing.

Both of the above are idiomatic but they have different meanings.

1 means hold your top with your hand(s).

2 means hold your top with your chin (after moving it there with your hand(s)).

| improve this answer | |
  • "Catch your shirt under your chin" is what my mother would have said. – Michael Harvey Aug 10 at 16:45

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