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Could you tell me if the use of the word more adds anything to the meaning in the following context?

If you chopped off the head of a venomous snake, be careful: its head can stay alive for a few minutes.

If you chopped off the head of a venomous snake, be careful: its head can stay alive for a few more minutes.

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  • Present tense in the if clause would be better. "If you chop" since this advice probably applies to the future as well as the past.
    – James K
    Commented Jan 25, 2023 at 5:56

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“More” is useful because the few minutes are in addition to all the minutes it was alive prior to being chopped off, but it is clear from context that’s what is meant so it’s not incorrect to leave it out.

Also, use “its head” (head of it) rather than “it’s head” (it is head). The possessive forms of pronouns are unusual.

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