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If I were to say, "I have anything". what would I be saying? Also I have seen one question about anything vs nothing. What about anything vs everything? I also have a question about what seems to be a contradiction of sense and reference when asking this same question negatively. i.e. I don't have anything

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You don't say "I have anything", it doesn't have a real meaning.

You can say "I can have anything", or "I don't have anything". You can say as a question "Do I have anything?" But there is no meaning to "I have anything".

If you have an object it is no longer "any thing". It is now a particular thing, it is the thing that you have. If you have it, is becomes a "something". So you can say "I have something". So it is grammatically correct to say "I have anything" but the meaning doesn't work.

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  • Ok. I do see your point, and I have come to that assumption as well, which made me wonder about there seeming to be a contradiction. What if I say " I am not reading from the script I am just saying anything ", " I was speaking from my script and then I I just said anything", or "I plan on reading from the script and then I will start to say anything" would these all be meaningless as well? With this the current tense sentence seems to be most at risk for being meaningless, but are the other meaningless as well? Or am I going completely off track here. Which I tend to do at times – Tommyboiz Aug 14 '20 at 23:13
  • The contradiction for me arises when thinking about saying I cant have anything. So if we have established that having anything is meaningless then we would have to assume that the statement " I can't have anything" is true. For the fact that if we have anything it is then something, so then the statement " can't have anything" would have to be true. Because as you said if someone has anything it is then something. But if we can't prove that we can have anything by saying " I can't have anything" this leads me to seeing a contradiction of what the word means – Tommyboiz Aug 15 '20 at 6:07

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