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So I told him to get the .... out of my car. At first he thought I was joking, but then he got out.

Could you please provide me with some alternatives to got out here? Does left sound odd? The one saying the line is a young cool dude, what would he say?

  • The specific context of the first part of the sentence looks like an omitted swear word is being used. If it's get the [swear word] out, you can't really replace out with anything else. This is mainly because of the definite article. When the is used, it sort of changes out from a verb to a noun. To maintain parallelism, you also want to mirror the first use of out with another use, even though they are serving different functions. If you don't care about the first part of the sentence, I'm wondering why you didn't just provide the simpler sentence he got out of the car. – Jason Bassford Aug 19 at 15:30
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Most fluent English speakers would say "he got out of the car". That's pretty much the conventional way to say that someone was in a car and isn't in the car any more.

If you are being formal you can say "exited the vehicle". Yes, you could say he "left the car", but people rarely say that. I'm hard pressed to think of other common ways to express the idea. If you want to be more colorful or descriptive you might use more dramatic words, like "he bolted out of the car" or "he tumbled out of the car" or "he stumbled out of the car". But for just the conventional idea of, he was in the car and now he's outside the car, we almost always say, "he got out of the car".

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For a mildly humorous effect, I would repeat the swear word for emphasis.

So I told him to get the .... out of my car. At first he thought I was joking, but then he got the .... out.

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