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Please read below text. Could you say why it's necessary to use "I'm making" & "My friends say" in this context, but not "I make" & "My friends are saying"?

I’m taking the opportunity to improve my English. I make good progress, I think. My friends are saying my pronunciation is much better than I arrived...

I thought that it's necessary to use "I make", because it's a fact or my opinion. --> Present Simple.

I thought that it's necessary to use "My friends are saying", because it's an action around now. --> Present Continuous.

Where are mistakes in my thinking?

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“progress” is inherently something that happens over time, so the simple present doesn’t work unless you add something to show it’s continuous:

  • I make progress every day.

Without that, you have to use a continuous verb:

  • I am making progress.

“saying” has the opposite problem: it is continuous when presumably you mean a series of separate events:

  • My friends say ...

The exception to this is when there are so many people saying the same thing that it becomes continuous:

  • Everyone is saying ...

Consider the difference between these statements:

  • The bird chirps.
  • Birds are chirping.
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  • I don't understand to the full extent about "My friends say..."
    – Sergey
    Aug 20 '20 at 9:47
  • The bird chirps, as I understand, it means that every bird chirps like every man says something, isn't it?
    – Sergey
    Aug 20 '20 at 9:49
  • "Birds are chirping" it means that some birds are chirping now. Right?
    – Sergey
    Aug 20 '20 at 9:51
  • "Everyone is saying..." is like a template for a sentence. For example, "Everyone is saying that the sky is blue." Am I right?
    – Sergey
    Aug 20 '20 at 9:54
  • But what about "My friends say..."? Why is necessary to use the Present Simple?
    – Sergey
    Aug 20 '20 at 9:57

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