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May you tell me what is the difference among them? I see these three words in one paper and I feel these words are the same meaning.

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    Could you edit your post to include the source, and some sentences/paragraphs where you found these?
    – Em.
    Aug 24, 2020 at 1:29

2 Answers 2

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In the particular example there is some idiomatic usage.

The silver-coloured, seven-sided coin that is worth 50p is called "a fifty pence piece"

The gold and silver coloured, twenty-sided coin that is worth £1 is called "a pound coin".

There doesn't seem to be a logical reason for this. But we tend to say "five/ten/twenty pence piece" but "(two) pound coin". It is quite common to say "fifty pence coin", but "one pound piece" is rather unusual (perhaps limited to coin collector jargon)

So "fifty pence" is an amount of money, it could be a coin, or cheque or a number in a bank account. "fifty-pence piece" is one specfic coin (silver with seven sides) and fifty-pence pieces is the plural.

Note that "fifty" in these examples is the value of the coin, not the number of coins.

He has seven fifty-pence pieces, and five two-pound coins, so he has £13.50 in total.

If you meant 50 coins, each worth 1p you would say "50 pennies". The name of the 1p coin is "a penny"

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Well, "fifty pence" is an amount of money. "Pence" is another way of saying "pennies" when referring to the currency (but not to the actual coin itself).

A "piece", in this context, is a "coin". So "fifty pence piece" is a coin that is worth fifty pence.

"Fifty pence pieces" is just the plural of that. It means several coins, each of which is worth 50p.

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  • But I see this phrase: fifty pence pieces and pound coins. If “fifty pence piece” are referred to “coin”, how can he said: fifty pence pieces and pound coins? He obvious repeated.
    – Y. zeng
    Aug 24, 2020 at 3:00
  • What's the problem? He just chose to use different synonyms. That phrase means "coins that are each worth 50 pence and coins that are each worth one pound".
    – Len
    Aug 24, 2020 at 3:02
  • What he said can be transfer to: a coin that is worth fifty pence, and pound coins. Am I right? How could you know that what he said are coins that are each with 50 pence and coins that are worth one pound each?
    – Y. zeng
    Aug 24, 2020 at 3:09
  • The "coins" is referring to things that are worth one pound each, and it is plural. The "pieces" is referring to things that are worth 50p each, and it is plural. Those are separate things, but both are true.
    – Len
    Aug 24, 2020 at 3:14
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    You could say 'one pound piece' and be understood, in fact coin collectors use the term. So you could talk about "fifty pence and one pound pieces (or coins)". Aug 24, 2020 at 6:03

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