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What and why should I use to mean websites or organizations, 'them' or 'those'? Should I use those in every case, except if I'm indicating a group of persons?

Example Sentence: There are many websites where you can teach people languages online. Many websites also hire language teachers. But all of them/those mightn’t work for you.

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    Neither version of your final sentence is particularly idiomatic. Better would be But some might not work for you or But they might not all work for you. Or But not all of them will necessarily work for you - I can't see any easy way to include "might" as well as explicitly making the point that what you're saying in the final sentence does not apply to all websites that hire language teachers. – FumbleFingers Aug 31 '20 at 14:12
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Neither version of your final sentence is particularly idiomatic.

"mightn’t" isn't often used in English. Choose "might not".

The meaning of "might" is to add an element of conditionality or uncertainty. This could best be accomplished as follows:

But not all of them will necessarily work for you.

Other options to be aware of, although I don't think they are precisely right for this case:

But some might not work for you
But they might not all work for you.

When editing text you have to consider the context: what are the previous sentences, and what are the next few sentences? You have provided a part of the puzzle (the preceding text) but not the next part (the following text). This makes it difficult to give a conclusive answer.

Should I use "those" in every case, except if I'm indicating a group of persons?

No.

Here are three choices, any of which are possible:

this->these
that->those
he/she/it->they/them

"They" can be used with inanimate objects. From wiktionary:

"I have a car and a truck, but they are both broken."

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