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I was reading about the Edwards v Canada (AG) case on Wikipedia, and in the petition put forward by her and the other famous five to the federal government I read the following sentence:

I. Is power vested in the Governor-General in Council of Canada, or the Parliament of Canada, or either of them, to appoint a female to the Senate of Canada?

My question is this; does the clause "or either of them" contribute anything to the sentence?

I was wondering if it might be meaning "both" in this instance, but at least according to this site, which was one of the top results on Google when trying to find out if that is a valid use, "it means (...) one or the other, but not both of them simultaneously"

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I think it asks whether one of the following is true:

  1. The Governor-General can appoint a female (but the Parliament can't), or
  2. The Parliament can appoint a female (but the Governor-General can't), or
  3. Either the Governor-General or the Parliament can appoint a female.

In this context, saying that either A or B can do the thing is the same as saying that both A and B can do the thing.

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I think the sentence should have an "either", but not tacked on at the end.

I. Is power vested in either the Governor-General in Council of Canada, or the Parliament of Canada, to appoint a female to the Senate of Canada?

In a sentence with an "or" that means "either/or", it might make sense to add at the end "or both of them", but "or either of them" doesn't make sense.

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