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Most of the times, I have seen that 'reason being' is used in the middle of a sentence with a fixed expression 'the reason being is that'. As reason being is similar to 'because', can we use it in the starting of a sentence? Consider this sentence :

For non-living things, the apostrophe + s is not used. Reason being, non-living things cannot own things.

For non-living things, the apostrophe + s is not used. The reason being, non-living things cannot own things.

For non-living things, the apostrophe + s is not used, the reason being is that non-living things cannot own things.

Which ones are correct among these examples. I am also confused that do we need to use 'the' before 'reason being' when we use it to start a new sentence and is the comma usage correct in the third sentence?

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    The reason being is a standard phrase meaning the reason [for what I have just said} is... It is illogical and incorrect to use both 'being' and 'is', as they are different parts of the same verb. So your second example is the correct one (or, better still, the reason being that...). – Kate Bunting Sep 4 '20 at 7:58
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Only the second example is correct.
You can use any of

The reason being,
The reason is,
Because,

However, I feel that the sentence being used as an example is incorrect.
I would expect to see eg

The car's wheel ...
The aerial's loading coil ...
The mountain's peak.

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