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A, B, and C must not be treated as each other. That is:

  • Don't treat A as B, and vice versa.
  • Don't treat B as C, and vice versa.
  • Don't treat C as A, and vice versa.

A, B, and C are nouns. For example, apples, oranges, and pineapples.

Whether "must not be treated as each other" is a correct phrase here? How to say it correctly?

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  • The phrase is notionally correct but is very unusual and without context it would be wholly inobvious what was meant. Sep 4 '20 at 12:12
  • @RussellMcMahon It's a phrase in a programming language style guide; a recommendation to not use regex-oriented functions without real necessity. "Don’t use RegExMatch() or RegExReplace() if InStr(), StrReplace(), SubStr(), or Trim() is sufficient."
    – james
    Sep 4 '20 at 12:17
  • Well, that certainly establishes the context. But in an English Language Learners site it seems to have minimal relevance. I think I'm missing something. Sep 4 '20 at 12:20
  • @RussellMcMahon Oh my God. I asked another question and my previous comment is related to that question, not this one. Sorry. It is very stupid.
    – james
    Sep 4 '20 at 12:22
  • @RussellMcMahon What I mean here is list with 3 bullet points: 1. Don’t treat True and False as 1 and 0, and vice versa; 2. Don’t treat 0 as an empty string, and vice versa; 3. Don’t treat an empty string as False, and vice versa.
    – james
    Sep 4 '20 at 12:25
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We can use "each other" about two or more items, when we wish to say that each of them does something to one or more of the others. "A, B, or C must not be treated as each other" means:

A must not be treated as B or C

B must not be treated as A or C

C must not be treated as A or B

Each other (Macmillan Dictionary)

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Apples, oranges, and pineapples must not be treated as each other.

The phrase is notionally correct but is very unusual and without context it would be wholly inobvious what was meant. Most English speakers encountering this sentence would be puzzled by it.

The phrase would attract attention due to it's unusualness and I'd not expect to ever see it used. Does it mean they do not taste the same?, or should be cooked differently, or are stored differently or ...?

Equally the meaning of "Fords Hondas and Bentleys must not be treated as each other." is obscure,

As is "Dogs, Cats, Monkeys must not be treated as each other." is also obscure, but perhaps slightly less so and the idea of "treating animals" in ways that suit them is an accepted concept. Whereas, the meaning of "treating cars" or "treating fruit" is open to interpretation .

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