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  • Though it's generally discouraged, this approach is acceptable in some rare cases.
  • Though generally discouraged, this approach is acceptable in some rare cases.

"it" in the first sentence is a relative pronoun for "this approach".

Are both of these sentence correct? I ask it because I'm not sure about the second.

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    Yes: they are both correct, though "it" is not a relative pronoun but a pronoun referring to "this approach". Grammatically, the difference is that the complement of "though" in your first example is a full content clause while in the second it's a participial clause.
    – BillJ
    Commented Sep 9, 2020 at 17:12
  • @BillJ , thanks. Stylistically, which version would you prefer?
    – john c. j.
    Commented Sep 9, 2020 at 17:18
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    My preference would be for your second example.
    – BillJ
    Commented Sep 9, 2020 at 17:29
  • @BillJ, I apologise for miss-spelling your name. Commented Sep 10, 2020 at 10:43

1 Answer 1

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  1. Though it's generally discouraged, this approach is acceptable in some rare cases.

  2. Though generally discouraged, this approach is acceptable in some rare cases.

As BillJ pointed out, "it" in the first sentence is a pronoun rather than relative pronoun (who, whose, which, and that) for "this approach".

Both examples are fine, and I prefer the latter's brevity.

Edit: I corrected the name to BillJ.

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