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There are two sentences with "thought of",

Oh, Paul, even the thought of you in all that danger, it was just too much.

She’s the single most beautiful girl I’ve ever seen, and the thought of touching her like this and not being able to see her ... — is torture.

The first one doesn't contain "being" but the second does. Why?

... even the thought of you being in all that danger, ...

Does this sentence sound natural?

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    Yes, the second sentence contains the word being, but not in the same phrase as thought of. There is no rule that says thought of has to be followed by being. You could include it in your first sentence if you wanted to, but it isn't essential. – Kate Bunting Sep 10 '20 at 7:59
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'Oh, Paul, even the thought of you in all that danger, it was just too much.'

'Oh, Paul, even the thought of you being in all that danger, it was just too much.'

To summarise after @Kate Bunting's comments, both examples are fine.

I personally prefer shorter versions in general.

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