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Is there an English idiom or a phrasal verb I could use to express that something can't be counted with money ?

For example when something is so risky or important that it can't be counted with money.

For context: "The risk is very high however many women agree to be surrogate mothers.They are well-paid but I think pregnancy and delivery can't be counted with money."

I've added the before pregnancy and delivery but removed it because I think that articles are unnecessary.

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There is the word “invaluable”, which literally means you can’t value something.

A common idiom people use is to say you “can’t put a price on” something. For example:

Though surrogate mothers are well paid, you really can’t put a price on the risks involved in pregnancy and delivery.

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  • Can I say "No matter how much a surrogate mother charges, it won't be enough to pay in full"? – Antonia A Sep 10 '20 at 10:15
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    It wouldn’t be particularly idiomatic, as “pay in full” is very much a financial term, and doesn’t really lend itself to what you’re trying to express. – Chris Mack Sep 10 '20 at 11:32
  • Would you please suggest a similar expression instad of "pay in full"? – Antonia A Sep 10 '20 at 12:43
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    I would suggest something like, “... enough to truly compensate her [for the risks she’s taking].” – Chris Mack Sep 10 '20 at 14:48
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    Or "No matter how much a surrogate mother charges, she can never truly be repaid." – rjpond Sep 10 '20 at 17:43
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"The risk is very high however many women agree to be surrogate mothers.They are well-paid but I think pregnancy and delivery can't be counted with money."

I propose 'should not be equated with the money'. Also, 'pay well' as 'pregnancy and delivery' is the antecedent of the pronoun 'they'. Lastly, I add some punctuation signs.

My suggestion is as follows:

"The risk is very high; however, many women agree to be surrogate mothers. They pay well but I think pregnancy and delivery should not be equated with the money."

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