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He's sick. He will see a doctor

I don't know is it a prediction or intention?
What's the crucial point between prediction and intention when I use "will"?

I need a cut line to differentiate between the two ideas.

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    The distinction is in the context, and also native speakers will use a form of words that avoid doubt, e.g. he is planning to see the doctor, or he is expecting to see the doctor. Sep 11, 2020 at 12:34
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    This has already been discussed under your earlier question. He will see a doctor suggests that he has an appointment to see one, so I suppose it's a prediction. If it was just an intention you would say He intends/plans/means to see a doctor. Sep 11, 2020 at 12:35
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    please provide the context!
    – Liiuc
    Sep 11, 2020 at 12:55

2 Answers 2

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He's sick. He will see a doctor

If I heard someone say this, I would presume that "he" didn't wish to see a doctor but that the speaker was mandating it.

Example

Roberta: Father, James says he is fine and doesn't need a doctor.

Father: I don't care what he says; He's sick. He will see a doctor, whether he wants to or not.


EDIT

As is so often the case, the answer depends on the context. That is why you are getting conflicting answers. You haven't provided context so we have to provide our own.

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  • what's the priority to mind if there is a lack in context?
    – Waleed Gh
    Sep 11, 2020 at 13:25
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    @WaleedGh If no context is supplied, the meaning isn't fully determined. One priority in that case is to ask the speaker what they meant. Sep 11, 2020 at 13:51
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One criterion is "Who is making the statement?".

"He will see a doctor." is probably a statement of prediction, because it as a statement about another person.

"I will see a doctor." is probably a statement of the speaker's intention, because it is about oneself. A person usually declares their intentions, rather than making predictions about themselves.

There may be other cases where context indicates the meaning.

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