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Which one is correct and why is it correct?

I'm sure he's going to win.
I'm sure he will win.

another question, please:

a)Which one is correct and why is it correct?

1-Look at the dark clouds. I think it’s going to rain. 2-look at the dark clouds. I think it will rain. 3-Both of the above sentences are correct.

B)Which one is correct and why?

1-Look at the dark clouds. I'm sure it’s going to rain. 2-look at the dark clouds. I'm sure it will rain. 3-Both of the above sentences are correct.

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  • 2
    Both are correct and mean the same thing.
    – Chris Mack
    Sep 15 '20 at 11:02
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    There is no single future tense in English. There are numerous constructions that are used to refer to the future. The problem lies with the examiner who may consider that only the use of will serves this purpose. Sep 15 '20 at 11:42
  • 2
    What exactly was asked in the exam? Sep 15 '20 at 12:02
  • 1
    These are very bad exam questions, because both options are perfectly idiomatic. Sep 15 '20 at 12:55
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    I agree that the exam questions are awful because any of the two options are appropriate. However, in some grammar books there is the notion that "will" is better suited for expressing opinions, and "going to" for certainties. As in: "I think (=I'm not 100% sure) he'll win" and "He's (definitely) going to win!" when the person is about to cross the finishing line, or win the last point. Does "sure" in the examples refer to the speaker's opinion "think" or to something that is evidently true? Who knows? Were these questions made up by the teacher?
    – Mari-Lou A
    Sep 15 '20 at 13:26
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“is going to do” is considered informal by speakers and sloppy by teachers because we have a real future tense in “will do”, which is preferred in formal writing.

There is a subtle difference in intent vs commitment, but in practice the two are used interchangeably.

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  • 1
    Downvoter, please explain why.
    – StephenS
    Sep 15 '20 at 15:04
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    I know that "be going" is used in informal speaking instead of "will" but it also has usage in formal speaking and grammar.
    – Waleed Gh
    Sep 16 '20 at 7:20

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