1

Can I use a prepositional phrase such as "from the colonial period on" to lead a sentence?

From the colonial period on the Haitian mulatto and black bourgeoisie have embraced the Catholic religion, European culture, French language, and Western ways.

  • Hi welcome to ELL! Your question bordered on a proofreading request. I have edited it to make it more specific. Please keep in mind: when you ask a question rather than asking whether a sentence is grammatical, you should identify in the sentence things specific things you have difficulty with. – Eddie Kal Sep 15 at 17:59
2

The sentence is grammatically correct, but it is hard to parse.

At first, I thought "the Haitian mulatto" was the complement of "on". I needed to read the rest of the sentence to be able to understand that "on" was an adverb.

My first recommendation is to add a comma:

From the colonial period on, the Haitian mulatto and black bourgeoisie have embraced the Catholic religion, European culture, French language, and Western ways.

I also recommend using "onward" instead of "on" for clarity. This is because "on" is also a preposition, which was the source of my confusion. Whereas "onward" is unambiguously an adverb:

From the colonial period onward, the Haitian mulatto and black bourgeoisie have embraced the Catholic religion, European culture, French language, and Western ways.

Depending on the context of the sentence, you might want to simplify it even more:

Since colonial period, the Haitian mulatto and black bourgeoisie have embraced the Catholic religion, European culture, French language, and Western ways.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.