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I've tried to come up with some sentences to exercise my skill in reported speech. I've been wondering if they all seem correct and natural to native speakers. I also wonder which is considered the most correct and the purist version of the language, i.e. the best practice for which I could get a good grade on some formal exam.

The original direct speech on which I base all the following reported speech:

"I was studying all day long yesterday, I am working now and tomorrow I will go to the hospital."

Reported speech - version 1:

He explained that he had been studying all day long yesterday, was working now, and would go to the hospital tomorrow."

(The mentioned yesterday, now and tomorrow are all related to the present moment.)

Reported speech - version 2:

An alternative version with supposedly the same meaning as the one above:

"He explained that he was working all day long yesterday, is working now, and will go to the hospital tomorrow."

Reported speech - version 3:

He explained that he had been studying all day long the day before (=the previous day), was working then, and would go to the hospital the next day (=the following day).

UPDATE:

It seems the correct way to convert it into reported speech would be:

He explained that he was working all day yesterday, was working now, and would go to the hospital tomorrow.

My reasoning:

"I was working all day yesterday." - He said he was working all day yesterday. ("yesterday" is still "yesterday", the simple past and "yesterday" remain unchanged.)

Although I'm not sure if it's interchangeable with this in the given context: He said he had been working all day yesterday?

"I am working now." - He said he was working now. ("now" is still "now" or rather it's synonymous to the present moment) But I'm in doubt about the word now. Is it interchangeable with then in this context?

"I will go to the hospital tomorrow." - He said he would go to the hospital tomorrow. ("tomorrow" is still in the future)

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    Version #2 is invalid because of is and will. There's nothing wrong with using was instead of had been for the initial "Past within the Past" reference; it's just that we'd usually use the Perfect form there. Note that we usually use then for this kind of Past reference, but now is acceptable. But you can't use yesterday to mean the day before here, so that one depends entirely on whether it really is still "yesterday". – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Sep 16 at 13:19
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    #2 seems fine to me, so long as now is understood to cover the time he said it and the time the current speaker is reporting it (i.e. he's still working at the moment). And "the day before" sounds right in version 3 too, it matches "the next day" and implies the speaker didn't say this today (otherwise it would sound a little weird). "Was working then" feels like it's still talking about "the day before" though, to me - I'd prefer something like "was currently working" to make the change of time frame more explicit, or "right then", if you really don't want to reuse "now"! – cactustictacs Sep 16 at 13:40
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    If you are studying for a formal exam they can expect you to show the conversion like you did in #3 and can frown at the lack of time conversion in #1. The #2 will likely be considered invalid. – Alexei Rayu Sep 16 at 17:17
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    @AlexeiRayu: Sounds like you've done those kind of formal exams yourself! Excellent brief summary! – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Sep 16 at 17:43
  • @FumbleFingersReinstateMonica I've done some further research and has come to this version: "He said he was studying all day yesterday, was working now, and would go to the hospital tomorrow" – Rusletov Sep 18 at 9:35

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