0

Is grammatically possible and natural to say I wish you weren't doing and I wish you wouldn't be doing? For example:

I wish you weren't smoking.

I wish you wouldn't be smoking.

If it is possible and natural, then what would be the difference in meaning between them and the following?

I wish you didn't smoke.

I wish you wouldn't smoke.

3
  • In all fairness, you can get a grammar lesson about wish in tons of places. Why makes us write it all out when it's easily found elsewhere?? For example, here: english-at-home.com/grammar/using-wish/….
    – Lambie
    Sep 16 '20 at 20:30
  • I am not sure what is the difference among the first two sentences (in block-quote) however the second one is as follows: "didn't smoke" indicates that the person is smoking right in front of you, and you were saying them on their face. Whereas, "wouldn't smoke" probably means something that could possibly happen in the future. In this case, something that you wish would happen in the near future. Sep 16 '20 at 20:35
  • Lambie: if you would be kind enouh to provide the place on the internet that answers my question, I would be grateful. I couldn't find such a place. And, the one you provided doesn't answer it. Sep 17 '20 at 7:18
0

I wish you weren't smoking.

Perfectly grammatical and natural. The person is smoking at the present moment and you wish they weren't.

I wish you wouldn't be smoking.

This is non-standard and odd sounding.

I wish you didn't smoke.

The person smokes on a regular basis but may or may not be smoking at the present moment. You wish they didn't have this habit.

I wish you wouldn't smoke.

Used similarly to the first, but can also be used if the person has just finished smoking.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.