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Are these two correct in terms of grammar? Is there any difference in nuances?

1 When the concert began I had a feeling that I had already seen it.

2 When the concert had begun I had a feeling that I had already seen it.

Would it be the right conclusion that in the first sentence the first action triggers the second one? The second happens straight after the first one. And the speaker watches the concert from the very beginning.

While in sentence 2 the speaker started watching the concert after a while since the concerted had started.

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  • Both are syntactically valid. There shouldn't be too much difference in meaning, except for the fact that the past perfect helps you emphasize something occurred after that. That said, I think the first one is perfectly logical, and I don't think any of them imply when the speaker started watching the concert.
    – Alex TheBN
    Sep 22, 2020 at 23:16

1 Answer 1

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1 When the concert began I had a feeling that I had already seen it.

In case 1, the realization happened at the moment the "began" event happened.

2 When the concert had begun I had a feeling that I had already seen it.

In case 2, the realization happened after the "began" event.

Both cases are valid. However, case 1 is better, since you used "When" at the beginning, which is usually (in this kind of structure) used to talk about a single moment. In case 2, it's better to use "After" instead of "When".

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