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A faucet is a device that controls the flow of a liquid or gas from a pipe or container. Sinks and baths have faucets attached to them.

This is the definition of the word faucet. My question is, if we replace the last sentence with "Sinks and baths have faucets that are attached to them", is it going to sound less natural or even a bit clumsy compared to the original one?

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    Does this answer your question? Is "which are" omitted from this sentence? In your context, attached to them looks to me like a reduced relative clause — a relative clause from which the relative expression and linking verb [which/that are] have been deleted. As covered by earlier question. – FumbleFingers Sep 19 '20 at 18:11
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Sinks and baths have faucets attached to them.

Sinks and baths have faucets that are attached to them.

Both are fine, but the original (without "that are") reads better.

(Note: Although common in North America, the word "faucet" is never used in British English: the term "tap" is used instead.)

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