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Yesterday, I have written my CV for job interview. In the work experience field I got stuck because I did not find the right word to define my job.

I am a teacher. Sometimes, I visit other schools in our near vicinity to take the examination of those schools' students. In that case I am acting as a external examiner. I was not able to define my this job position. I thought that I should describe it as a External examiner but then I thought that the phrase External examiner is not an ornamental term and certainly not fit with a excellent Cv.

As I am not a native English speaker I think that I did not find out the correct word because of my deficiency of vocabulary. However, this blog is sighted by lots of native English speaker. If someone have some good word choice regarding my job profile please describe it so that I can add it in my CV and make my cv more powerful.

Thank you for help.

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  • You're a peripatetic [exam] invigilator, to be precise! Both those highlighted terms are particularly strongly associated with academia / exams, so even if they've never encountered the specific collocation before, your target audience should understand it perfectly on first encounter. – FumbleFingers Sep 21 '20 at 12:19
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A think a basic term for this is "exam proctor" (AmE).

Proctor
[...]
In the United States and some other countries, the word "proctor" is frequently used to describe someone who oversees an examination (i.e. a supervisor or invigilator) or dormitory.

Examination supervisor
In the United States and some other countries, a proctor can be any teacher or other staff member at a university, secondary school or even elementary school when they are supervising the administration of a test or examination; i.e. the role referred to as an "invigilator" in British, Canadian, Australian and South African English.

Exam invigilator
An exam invigilator, exam proctor or exam supervisor is someone who is appointed by the examination board and services for maintaining the proper conduct of a particular examination in accordance with the exam regulations. It is the duty of the exam invigilator to watch the examination candidates to prevent cheating during the examination. They are required to ensure that all the exams are carried out according to the rules set out by the exam board which allows each candidate to sit for the examination under equal conditions as other candidates throughout the country.

You can easily explain your specific duties in the CV, particularly if you want to clarify that you travel to schools in the vicinity. If you really want to specify that point in the title, perhaps traveling exam proctor, or maybe visiting exam proctor. I don't know that these are commonly used titles, but I think they make sense.


[Too long to put in the comments/side note]

By the way, you give/administer/oversee/proctor the exam (AmE). The students take the exam. I assume this is what you meant (not take = deliver).

Students can also sit an exam (Cambridge Dictionary). I think this is more common in BrE.

This one is a little tricky for me. Students can also write an exam (Collins Dictionary). I'm not sure exactly where this is common, but I am more familiar with the teacher writing the exam (= producing the exam), not the student writing the exam (= taking the exam).

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  • Students "writing an exam" is an exclusively Canadian usage, in my experience. – Canadian Yankee Sep 21 '20 at 22:09
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An external examiner in the UK context is someone appointed to oversee the examination process, to keep standards uniform across the country. Such a person might include in their duties setting a paper, checking papers set by others, moderating the marks of others and conducting oral examinations of some or all students. If that is all or some of what you do then external examiner seems fine to me.

We do use the term invigilator as well but its meaning has already been set out in @Em's answer. Such people would almost always be internal to the organisation though not external.

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